How many roads must a man walk down?

47,809 notes

#oh my god #I’d forgotten this scene #this is why, isn’t it #this is why he always told her how special she was #how important #how brilliant #because he remembered the time when he was so callous #the time that, for all he knows, might have contributed to her shitty self esteem even more #the time he told her she wasn’t special or important #which coming from him is harsh #I mean the Doctor thinks everyone’s important #but in that moment #with a brain addled with heartbreak #and a heart aching for his Rose #he told her what she already thought about herself #and who knows #maybe that’s why she never believed him 

(Source: martincrief, via flawlessanna)

2,589 notes

"She does not really fall in love with Knightley, as Elizabeth Bennet does with Darcy. There is not a moment in Emma when she is not already in love with him. She thinks of him constantly and is always testing her own judgments and perceptions against his.” - Peter J. Leithart

(Source: knightley-emma, via hp-books-music-spn)

54,963 notes

marialuisa-pr:

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

bolding mine

(via flawlessanna)

90,225 notes

britishstarr:

kkristoff:

cold-never-bothered-me-anyways:

Arabian Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

GIVE ME THESE I M M E D I A T E L Y

I AM SO TEMPTED TO DRAW THIS YOU HAVE NO IDEA

(via wewant-ashrubbery)

4,849 notes

Criticisms about representations of gender (or race and other diversity) are often countered in fandom by sociological or scientific analyses attempting to explain why the inequality happens according to the internal logic of the fictional world. As though there is any real reason that anything happens in a story except that someone chose to write it that way.

Fiction is not Darwinian: It contains no impartial process of evolution that dispassionately produces the events of a fictional universe. Fiction is miraculously, fundamentally Creationist. When we make worlds, we become gods. And gods are responsible for the things they create, particularly when they create them in their own image.

Laura Hudson writes about the shotage of women characters in Star Wars fore Wired.com in her article "Leia is not enough:  Star Wars and the woman problem in Hollywood."

"Science fiction in particular has always offered a vision of the world not myopically limited by the world as it exists, but liberated by the power of imagination. Perhaps more than any genre of storytelling, it has no excuse to exclude women for so-called practical reasons — especially when it has every reason to imagine a world where they are just as heroic, exceptional, and well-represented as men."

(via rebelrebeluniverse)

(via aprillikesthings)

7,882 notes

surrexi:

"… it’s not just history. It’s me, I make it happen."

(via winterinthetardis)

GOD BLESS YOU, NILI. GOD BLESS YOU.

(Source: greatspacedustbin, via timelordsanddeatheaters)